• Watermark
    Lake Superior, Ontario - Victoria

I originally moved to the Great Lakes, in my early twenties when I decided to start a family. My then husband’s parents had a cabin on Lake Superior. I come from the west coast of the United States, so I had familiarity with the Pacific Ocean, and Western Rivers. Because of this, I had an image of what the Great Lakes might be, but I didn’t have any experience with them.

I was really fortunate to have some of my earliest Great Lakes experience with Lake Superior because it was a great experience. The water is clean, crisp and really cold at times. We boiled and drank water from the lake. We also bathed in the Lake, and I bathed my little babies in the lake. It was a very nurturing connection to have with the Lake.

I pulled away from the false impression that all the great lakes were in great condition. Later, when I was able to have some connections with some of the other Great Lakes, I was dismayed at their condition not being as clean, and accessible as Lake Superior. I was really surprised at how private and inaccessible the coastline was. I’ve come to learn about this talk with the ‘Lakes’ but coming from the West coast, I realized people there talk about ‘the Coast.’ Because really, the people interact with the coastline. Unless you have a boat, you are able to interact with the open lake. However, most people make connections of where the water meets the land.

I think there needs to be more appreciation and recognition of the Great Lakes as a coast and a coastal region, not just a series of whole Lakes, and where the coastal interface is with people. My experience with Lake Superior started this way of thinking and I hope others will embrace the coastal connection throughout the region.



Waterbody
Lake Superior, ON

Watersheds

Contributed By
Victoria

Collected By
Sarah Turk

Watermarks are true stories about you and your connection to a body of water. By archiving your story, you add to a living record of our shared water heritage, protecting these waters for generations to come. So tell us: What is your watermark?