St. Lawrence River, ON - Danny Mosier | Great Lakes Guide
  • Watermark
    St. Lawrence River, ON - Danny Mosier

My name is Danny Mosier and I’m from Wolfe Island, which is the biggest of the Thousand Island. It is located in the heart of the St. Lawrence, at the mouth of St. Lawrence and Lake Ontario. That’s where I grew up and it’s very important to me.

Where Lake Ontario meets the St. Lawrence River it’s a very unique body of water. There’s hunting, fishing, tourism, it is the sailing capital of the world, there’s lots of activities there. It’s a great place to grow up and be involved in. My favorite thing to do there is fishing. We have a lot of pan fish in the area, perch, rock bass, large mouth bass, small mouth bass, muskie. It’s quite a fishery and very important to our families. My grandfather taught me how to fish. At that time we grew up on the farm, so we didn’t have a lot of time to learn it and Sunday was kind of the day of rest so you took advantage of what you could that was different. You have to pay attention to the storms and stuff to know enough of when to get off the river or the lake. I got caught once in a pretty violent thunderstorm, but other than that it wasn’t that bad. You just sneak in somewhere.

Normally bass fishing at the start of the season is pretty intense and they’re aggressive and they’ve already come in to spawn so they’re down in the shallow so you can get at them – the success is pretty good compared to the deep when they go back out. I taught my own son and my grandson and my granddaughter how to fish, and my wife she didn’t know how to fish until we got married. We all do it now, we still eat them too believe it or not. We are all on wells on Wolfe island, some of the water comes from the river, we do the tests and everything is good.



Waterbody
St. Lawrence River, ON

Location
Wolfe Island, ON

Watersheds

Contributed By
Danny Mosier

Collected By
Krystyn Tully

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